How Kids can win at exams?

Exams are the most dreaded aspect of education for any student. Students are so much concerned about getting high grades that this leads to stress and under-preparedness for the exams. Exams aren’t difficult to ace, and if a student prepares well, he or she can easily obtain a high grade.

NAPLAN Exam

There are many ways to prepare for the exams. The most common ones are help from parents, group study, using online resources and/or tutoring by a qualified tutor. These are the most successful methods for preparing for an exam. Besides these, there are few other methods a student can follow to ace exams.

The first method is to study when the mind is fresh. It has been scientifically proven that the mind absorbs the most when it is fresh thus, a student should study early in the morning or after a small nap. Small naps help to rest the brain, thus making it fresh. This will enable the student to grasp more compared to when the brain is tired.

The other method is to take a break during the study. Continuous study can drain the brain which can tire the student. A small break will give the brain a rest and will also enable the student to recap what has been studied. This will also help the student to ensure that no content has been missed in the preparation for the exam.

A highly effective method to prepare for the exam when studying alone is to take mock exams. The student can prepare a mock exam based on the subject material he or she is studying or have a friend or family member make a mock exam. It is better that a friend or family member make the exam since the student himself won’t know beforehand what the questions are and this will be more of a test for the student. Another option could be to use online resources for such mock up exams.

Studying in a group is the best way to prepare for an exam. As the saying goes, two minds are better than one, can be seen being implemented here. If you might have considered a topic not important or skipped some points in class, other students will help validate that topic. Similarly, if you don’t understand a particular topic, another student will be able to explain it better. This way, no topic will be left behind and all students will be on the same page when considering what is important and what isn’t.

If you don’t want to study in a group and prefer to study alone, but often get distracted or need help, then preparing with a tutor is an effective method as well. The tutor will ensure that you concentrate on studying and not get distracted, and at the same time will also help to clarify any topic you don’t understand.

There isn’t any particular method that will help a student get good grades. A student should follow the method that best suits him or her. Group study is highly effective since other students will ensure everyone in the study group is on the same page, but some students are more successful when they study alone. To win any exam, you should do as many mock exams as possible. The more a student prepares, the better grades he or she will obtain.

Key Elements of NAPLAN Persuasive Writing {Part-3}

This is our 3rd part of NAPLAN writing blog series which covers persuasive writing. In our 1st blog, we have covered NAPLAN writing in detail whereas 2nd covers Narrative writing.

Persuasive Writing:

Persuasive writing is a style of writing where you try to convince or influence the reader on an issue. Persuasive Writing Your writing should convince the reader to
support your position or take a certain action. It can include arguments, discussions, expositions, letters to the editor, debates, reviews, and advertisements to support your case. Students are expected to write a continuous text and the text should include an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Introduction:

The introduction should convey the main idea of the text to the reader; it should be able to present the writer’s opinion on the prompt. The reader should be able to develop interest in the story after reading the introduction. Thus, it is important to have a good introduction. You can include a definition or generalization of the topic or the list of main points of the prompt to grab the reader’s
interest.

Body:

The body of the text should contain the details of your argument. You could present your case in the form of a non-fictional essay that incorporates points supporting your argument. These could include comparing and contrasting the points, listing and describing the points in details, or presenting cause and effects of the points. It is better to follow the structure type with which the writer can confidently express his opinion.

Conclusion:

The conclusion of the text should be able to present the writer’s point of view. There should be no new point of views about the topic, but simply a summary of the view point. It has to be well synchronized with the body part of the text.

Students should follow this structural pattern while writing the Persuasive test to achieve good marks. The structural pattern along with the following ten criterions used by the NAPLAN marker or grader to evaluate the Persuasive writing test are enough for the student to get a good result.

Marking criterion Description of narrative writing marking criterion
Audience The writer’s capacity to orient, engage and persuade the reader
Text structure The organisation of the structural components of a persuasive text (introduction, body and conclusion) into an appropriate and effective text structure
Ideas The selection, relevance and elaboration of ideas for a persuasive argument
Persuasive devices The use of a range of persuasive devices to enhance the writer’s position and persuade the reader
Vocabulary The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices
Cohesion The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word

associations)

Paragraphing The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assists the reader to follow the line of argument
Sentence structure The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound and meaningful sentences
Punctuation The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text
Spelling The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

The maximum points for Audience criteria is 6, Text Structure is 4, Ideas is 5, Persuasive devices is 4, Vocabulary is 5, Cohesion is 4, Paragraphing is 3, Sentence Structure is 6, Punctuation is 5, and Spelling is 6.

Now that we’ve covered the marking criteria, here are some tips that will enable the student to achieve high points in these criterions:

  1. Create an appropriate relationship with reader (e.g. polite, formal, social distance, personal connection)
  2. Reveal values and attitudes.
  3. Persuade through control of tenor.
  4. Appeal to reason, emotions and/ or cultural values.
  5. Subvert expectations (challenge readers’ values).
  6. Acknowledge wider audience.
  7. Ideas may include:
    • Psychological subjects.
    • Mature viewpoints.
    • Elements of popular culture.
    • Satirical perspectives.
    • Traditional sub-genre subjects.
  8. Convincing dialogue, introspection and reactions to other characters.
  9. Consistent use of word associations and substitutions that enhance reading.
  10. Deliberately structured to pace and direct the reader’s attention. Single sentence may be used as a dramatic or final comment or for emphasis.
  11. Sentence punctuation includes:
    • Capital letters to begin sentences.
    • Full stops to end sentences.
    • Question marks to end sentences.
    • Exclamation marks to end sentences.
  12. Noun capitalisation includes:
    • First names and surnames.
    • Titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Ms etc.
    • Place names: Paris, Italy.
    • Institution names: Valley High.
    • Days of week, months of year.
    • Street names: Ord St.
    • Book and film titles.
    • Holidays: Easter, Ramadan.
    • Historic events: World War II.

Finally, let’s look at a previous NAPLAN Narrative test prompt and how to write its text. The prompt the students were asked to write on was “Should children wear uniforms in school” and here’s the best way to answer it.

First, you should note down the main points:

  • Your viewpoint and state it clearly in the introductory paragraph.
  • Your series of arguments and how you will support each of them. What points you will include to support your point of view?
  • How will you summarize your point of view in the most persuasive way possible.
  • Whether you will add a call to action in your conclusion.

Then you should consider:

  • Give your narrative a title.
  • To write in the present tense.
  • Use words that will persuade the reader.
  • Start a new paragraph for each point that supports your argument.
  • Use a logical sequence with the paragraphs.
  • Finish with a strong conclusion that supports your introduction.
  • Check and edit your writing when you have finished.

NAPLAN writing test isn’t that hard. If a student follows the above guidelines and practices writing on different prompts, he/she can achieve a high score.

Key Elements of NAPLAN Narrative Writing {Part-2}

As promised, this is Part 2 of our NAPLAN writing blog series. In part 1, our team has covered key elements of NAPLAN writing. This blog focuses on NAPLAN Narrative writing style and next part will cover Persuasive style which will be published next week.

Narrative writing is a style of writing that tells a story. Its main purpose is to entertain the reader; it must be able to orient, engage, and ensure the audience understands the point. Most common Narrative text types are short stories, fairy-tales, fables, and myths. These can be imaginative or realistic stories, with most writers using real life event to base the stories. NAPLAN Exam Narrative Writing

For the NAPLAN writing test, Narrative writing requires an orientation, a complication, and a resolution which is basically the beginning, middle, and an end.

Orientation, often referred as the beginning, is basically an introduction to the story which includes introducing the story’s characters. The reader should get an idea about what the story is about.

Complication, often referred as the middle, is the most important element of Narrative writing and the largest. The writer presents a series of events that cause a conflict or problem, and then presents ways to overcome them.

Resolution, often referred as the ending, is the ending of the story. It reveals the way the problem was or wasn’t able to be solved.

Majority of the students follow this pattern of writing, but NAPLAN is flexible when grading Narrative text type test. A student can start with a resolution first and then build up on it through the complication while adding the orientation later. This leniency is only for the Narrative test.

When grading the Narrative text type test, NAPLAN markers or graders evaluate the Narrative writing test based on ten criterion. These are:

Marking criterion Description of narrative writing marking criterion
Audience The writer’s capacity to orient, engage and affect the reader
Text structure The organisation of narrative features including orientation, complication and resolution into an appropriate and

effective text structure

Ideas The creation, selection and crafting of ideas for a narrative
Character and setting Character: The portrayal and development of character
Setting: The development of a sense of place, time and atmosphere
Vocabulary The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices
Cohesion The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word

associations)

Paragraphing The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assists the reader to negotiate the narrative
Sentence structure The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound and meaningful sentences
Punctuation The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text
Spelling The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

 

The maximum points a student can achieve for Audience criteria is 6, Text Structure is 4, Ideas is 5, Character and Setting is 4, Vocabulary is 5, Cohesion is 4, Paragraphing is 2, Sentence Structure is 6, Punctuation is 5, and Spelling is 6.

Now that we’ve covered the marking criteria, here are some tips that will enable the student to achieve high points in these criterion’s:

1) Language choices should control writer/reader relationship, evoke an emotional response, and display irony.

2) Ideas may include psychological subjects, unexpected topics, mature viewpoints, and elements of popular culture. Traditional sub-genre subjects can also be included:

  • heroic quest
  • good vs evil
  • overcoming the odds

3) Use single precise words like hissed, yanked, absolutely, disgusted, exhilarating, rewarded, and eventually.

4) Consistent use of word associations and substitutions that enhance reading.

5) Deliberately structured the text to pace and direct the reader’s attention.  Single sentence may be used as a dramatic or final comment or for emphasis.

6) Sentence punctuation includes:

– Capital letters to begin sentences.

– Full stops to end sentences.

– Question marks to end sentences.

– Exclamation marks to end sentences.

7) Noun capitalisation includes:

– First names and surnames.

– Titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Ms etc.

– Place names: Paris, Italy.

– Institution names: Valley High.

– Days of week, months of year.

– Street names: Ord St.

– Book and film titles.

– Holidays: Easter, Ramadan.

– Historic events: World War II.

 

Finally, let’s look at a previous NAPLAN Narrative test prompt and how to write its text. The prompt the students were asked to write on was “The Soccer Final” and here’s the best way to answer it.

First, you should plan your narrative with all the important points:

  • When and where did the match took place and who played and came to watch.
  • How was the match? Was it one sided? Did any injuries occur?
  • Did the main characters encounter any problems? How were they overcome?
  • A coda where a moral or lesson to be learned is delivered.

Then you should consider:

  • Use a title for your narrative.
  • To write in the past tense.
  • Use the present tense when writing the dialogue.
  • Use the orientation to set the scene and mood and to introduce the characters, place, and time of the soccer final.
  • Pay attention to the words you use to describe the event and character’s reactions and feelings.
  • Use of nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs.
  • Check and edit your writing when you have finished.

 

NAPLAN writing test isn’t that hard. If a student follows the above guidelines and practices writing on different prompts, he/she can achieve a high score.

Key Elements of NAPLAN Writing {Part-1}

Parents and students are always looking for information on NAPLAN writing test, what to focus on? and what key things to keep in mind while writing text types?. Team at NAPLAN Resource thought to help people out by writing a 3-part series of blogs which could help parents as well as students in understanding the key elements of writing styles.

NAPLAN Writing Exam

NAPLAN Writing Exam

The Australian Curriculum requires students to be taught different forms of writing in the English classes. There are three main types of writing, often referred to as text types. Previously they were referred to as genres. The text types are narrative writing, informative writing, and persuasive writing.

To ensure that the students are being taught different writing types, they are evaluated through the Australian National Assessment Test, NAPLAN. The Years 3, 5, 7, and 9 students are given a prompt, which is basically a topic or an idea, and are asked to write about the prompt in a particular text type or genre.

Up to 2015, all the students were given one prompt to write on. But after consultation with test experts, state representatives, and researchers, there was a change and Years 3 and 5 were given one prompt to write on while Years 7 and 9 were given different prompt to write on. However, the text type is same for both the Year groups and the students are evaluated according to the same marking guide.

Narrative writing

Narrative writing is one of the text types that the students are tested on. This style of writing ensures that the student can orient, engage, and affect the audience’s attention. To do this, the student must be able to write in an approach that includes a beginning, a middle, and an end. The following table highlights the marking criterion for narrative writing:

Marking criterion Description of narrative writing marking criterion
Audience The writer’s capacity to orient, engage and affect the reader
Text structure The organisation of narrative features including orientation, complication and resolution into an appropriate and effective text structure
Ideas The creation, selection and crafting of ideas for a narrative
Character and setting Character: The portrayal and development of character
Setting: The development of a sense of place, time and atmosphere
Vocabulary The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices
Cohesion The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word associations)
Paragraphing The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assists the reader to negotiate the narrative
Sentence structure The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound and meaningful sentences
Punctuation The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text
Spelling The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

More details about narrative writing will be provided in our NAPLAN  Narrative Writing blog.

Persuasive writing:

Persuasive writing, also known as Argument texts, is a style of writing that presents a point of view or is aimed to persuade the reader. The writer must be able to persuade the reader to support his view point once the reader finishes reading the story. The following table highlights the marking criterion for persuasive writing:

Marking criterion Description of persuasive writing marking criterion
Audience The writer’s capacity to orient, engage and persuade the reader
Text structure The organisation of the structural components of a persuasive text (introduction, body and conclusion) into an appropriate and effective text structure
Ideas The selection, relevance and elaboration of ideas for a persuasive argument
Persuasive devices The use of a range of persuasive devices to enhance the writer’s position and persuade the reader
Vocabulary The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices
Cohesion The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word associations)
Paragraphing The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assists the reader to follow the line of argument
Sentence structure The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound and meaningful sentences
Punctuation The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text
Spelling The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

More details about persuasive writing will be provided in our NAPLAN Persuasive Writing blog.

 

Information writing is a style of writing that presents information or ideas about countries, people, places, or events. This could include descriptions, news articles, reports, and biographies. However, so far Information writing hasn’t been tested in NAPLAN, but this form needs to be studied so that students are prepared for it.